About

The College of Complementary Health Professionals of BC (CCHPBC) regulates chiropractors, registered massage therapists, naturopathic physicians, and traditional Chinese medicine practitioners and acupuncturists to ensure they have the competencies needed to practice and that they adhere to the standards needed for safe and ethical care.

Our Regulatory Role

In B.C.’s healthcare landscape, the College of Complementary Health Professionals of BC is dedicated to regulating health professionals whose professions harmonize wisdom with diverse and innovative health practices: acupuncturists, chiropractors, naturopathic physicians, registered massage therapists, and traditional Chinese medicine practitioners and acupuncturists. 

By regulating these professions in the public interest, the College helps uphold these professionals to the highest standards of safety, ethics, and care. 

The formation of the College in June 2024, merged distinct, yet complementary health professions under one regulatory banner, representing a significant leap forward in health regulation. This strategic unification has been designed to streamline regulatory processes, elevate public safety, and cultivate an integrated health community through shared knowledge, resources, and standards.

Central to the College’s mission is its role to serve the public interest by working to ensure ethical and safe healthcare, with a commitment to transparency and integrity. It fulfills this role in several ways:

  • by rigorously enforcing professional standards and practices,
  • by managing the registration and professional development of the health professionals it regulates,
  • by managing and responding to public complaints.

Through dedication to excellence, the College of Complementary Health Professionals of BC is set to modernize the landscape of regulation for complementary healthcare professionals, helping to ensure safer and ethical healthcare practices for everyone living in BC.

Professions We Regulate

Chiropractors

What is A Chiropractor?

Chiropractors are licensed primary health-care professionals who:

  • diagnose and assess disorders of the spine or other joints of the body, muscles and the nervous system
  • treat disorders and conditions of the nervous, muscular and skeletal systems with a variety of treatment options, including manual therapy, massage, exercise recommendations, and posture correction
  • provide advice and counselling on matters related to the condition of the spine or other joints of the body, muscles and the nervous system
  • are permitted to take and read X-rays when they are clinically necessary to assist in diagnosis

Use of Reserved Titles

In B.C., only chiropractors who are registered with the College of Complementary Health Professionals of BC can legally call themselves:

  • “Chiropractor”
  • “Chiropractic Doctor”
  • “Doctor of Chiropractic”

Standards & Legislation

Chiropractors in B.C. are governed under the following:

as well as other provincial legislation applicable to health professionals.

Public Register

Check the Public Register to verify that an individual is currently registered/licensed to practice with the College of Complementary Health Professionals of BC, and to see information about credentials and scope of practice.

Complaints

Chiropractors must practice in a competent, safe and ethical manner. If you have concerns that the care you received does not meet the standards of practice, please share them with the College by filing a complaint.

Naturopathic Physicians

What is a naturopathic physician?

Naturopathic physicians provide:

  • Health care services that combine modern scientific knowledge with traditional and natural forms of medicine
  • both primary care and complementary medicine, treating acute and chronic conditions while also promoting prevention and overall well-being.

The philosophy of naturopathic medicine is to stimulate the body’s natural healing power, addressing the root cause of illness rather than simply treating symptoms. Naturopathic treatments are tailored to each individual patient to enhance overall health and wellness.

Use of Reserved Titles

In B.C., only naturopathic physicians who are registered with the College of Complementary Health Professionals of BC may use the following titles:

  • “naturopathic doctor”
  • “naturopathic physician”
  • “naturopath”

Standards & Legislation

Naturopathic physicians in B.C. are governed under the following:

as well as other provincial legislation applicable to health professionals.

Public Register

Check the Public Register to verify that an individual is currently registered/licensed to practice with the College of Complementary Health Professionals of BC, and to see information about credentials and scope of practice.

Complaints

Naturopathic Physicians must practice in a competent, safe and ethical manner. If you have concerns that the care you received does not meet the standards of practice, please share them with the College by filing a complaint.

Registered Massage Therapists

What is a Registered Massage Therapist?

Registered massage therapists are registered health-care professionals who:

  • assess soft tissue and joints of the body for the treatment and prevention of dysfunction, injury, pain and physical disorders
  • have undergone extensive post-secondary education in the treatment and prevention of injury, pain and physical disorders though the manual anipulation of structures of the body, such as ligaments, tendons, connective tissue, muscles, blood vessels, organs and other soft tissues.

Use of Reserved Titles

In B.C., only massage therapists who are registered with the College of Complementary Health Professionals of BC can legally call themselves:

  • “Registered Massage Therapist”
  • “Massage Therapist”
  • “Registered Massage Practitioner”
  • “Massage Practitioner”
  • Or, the abbreviations “RMT”, “MT”, “RMP”, and “MP”

In addition, anyone who is not a College registrant in the designated health profession of massage therapy is prohibited from using these titles as part of a different or longer title to describe themselves or their work.

The terms “massage specialist”, “bodyworker”, “spa therapist”, and “Raynor therapist” are not reserved by law in BC. Any individual with an interest in massage, no matter his/her/their level of education, may use these terms. These unregulated individuals do not necessarily carry liability insurance and there is no recourse to the College should they practice unsafely, ineffectively, or unethically.

Standards & Legislation

Massage therapists in B.C. are governed under the following:

as well as other provincial legislation applicable to health professionals.

Public Register

Check the Public Register to verify that an individual is currently registered/licensed to practice with the College of Complementary Health Professionals of BC, and to see information about credentials and scope of practice.

Complaints

Registered Massage Therapists must practice in a competent, safe and ethical manner. If you have concerns that the care you received does not meet the standards of practice, please share them with the College by filing a complaint.

Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners and Acupuncturists

What is a traditional Chinese medicine practitioner/acupuncturist?

Traditional Chinese medicine practitioners and acupuncturists:

  • look at the balance of body, mind and spirit to determine how to restore the yin-yang balance (qi) and good health
  • have extended clinical practice, advanced training, and substantive theoretical knowledge
  • are trained to diagnose various conditions
  • can help prevent disease and manage certain disorders and imbalances using a range of treatments. Treatment can include acupuncture, cupping, acupressure, herbal medicines, massage, exercise, lifestyle counselling, and other holistic health approaches.

Use of Reserved Titles

In B.C., only traditional Chinese medicine practitioners and acupuncturists who are registered with the College of Complementary Health Professionals of BC can legally call themselves:

  • Registered Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioner (R.TCM.P.): Authorized to practise acupuncture, and prescribe, compound, or dispense Chinese herbal medicine.
  • Registered Acupuncturist (R.Ac.): Authorized to practise acupuncture.
  • Registered Traditional Chinese Medicine Herbalist (R.TCM.H.): Authorized to prescribe, compound, or dispense Chinese herbal medicine.
  • Doctor of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Dr.TCM): Authorized to practise acupuncture, and prescribe, compound, or dispense Chinese herbal medicine. Has met training and examination requirements at a higher level than registrants with titles listed above.
  • Student Registrant: Authorized to perform clinical treatment procedures ONLY while under the  supervision of a full registrant in a recognized training setting

Standards & Legislation

Traditional Chinese medicine practitioners and acupuncturists in B.C. are governed under the following:

as well as other provincial legislation applicable to health professionals.

Public Register

Check the Public Register to verify that an individual is currently registered/licensed to practice with the College of Complementary Health Professionals of BC, and to see information about credentials and scope of practice.

Complaints

Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners and Acupuncturists must practice in a competent, safe and ethical manner. If you have concerns that the care you received does not meet the standards of practice, please share them with the College by filing a complaint.

Other Regulatory Colleges in BC

Regulates audiologists, dietitians, hearing instrument practitioners, occupational therapists, opticians, optometrists, physical therapists, psychologists, and speech-language pathologists.

Regulates certified dental assistants, dental hygienists, dental technicians, dental therapists, dentists and denturists.

Cultural safety and humility

According to the First Nations Health Authority (FNHA):

Cultural safety is an outcome based on respectful engagement that recognizes and strives to address power imbalances inherent in the healthcare system. It results in an environment free of racism and discrimination, where people feel safe when receiving health care.

Cultural humility is a process of self-reflection to understand personal and systemic biases and to develop and maintain respectful processes and relationships based on mutual trust. Cultural humility involves humbly acknowledging oneself as a learner when it comes to understanding another’s experience.

On March 1, 2017, BC’s health regulatory colleges, the First Nations Health Authority, and the Ministry of Health signed the Declaration of Commitment to the Cultural Safety and Humility in the Regulation of Health Professionals Serving First Nations and Aboriginal People in British Columbia. This declaration pledged a commitment to advancing cultural safety and humility among all regulated health professions in BC.

Making a meaningful and ongoing commitment to cultural safety and humility in the regulation of health professionals serving Indigenous peoples is a fundamental priority for the College.

Territorial acknowledgement


The College of Complementary Health Professionals of BC (CCHPBC) regulates more than 10,000 health professionals, including: acupuncturists, chiropractors, massage therapists, naturopathic physicians, and traditional Chinese medicine practitioners, who practise in the province of what is referred to today as B.C. We acknowledge that the College serves all people living in the traditional and unceded territories of more than 200 First Nations which comprise the land colonially known as British Columbia.

Our Board

The Board is responsible for leading the College of Complementary Health Professionals of BC (CCHPBC) and for ensuring that the College fulfils its duties and objects set out in the Health Professions Act. Board members provide strategic leadership. They guide the organization’s direction, ensure necessary resources, and monitor performance to meet the College’s mandate. The Board and Registrar/CEO work together to ensure that CCHPBC fulfils its public protection role. 

The Board consists of six registrant members (at least one member and not more than two members from each profession regulated by the College) and six public members (appointed by the Minister of Health). Members are selected so that collectively they bring diverse practice, lived experience, provincial geography, and professional skills to the table. Of the 12 Board members, the goal is to have at least two Indigenous members.

REGISTRANT MEMBERS:

  • Dr. Christopher Anderson
  • Dr. Kelly Fujibayashi
  • Dr. Elliot Mayhew
  • Jonathan Norton
  • Asa Tooshkenig
  • Jason Tutt
PUBLIC MEMBERS:

  • Benjamin Campbell
  • Harmohanjit Pandher
  • Allan Seckel (designated Board Chair)
  • Jocelyn Stanton
  • Terri Van Steinburg
  • Jacqueline Tarantino

Committees

Committees — some of which have a regulatory role and some of which support the Board — play a vital role in the College’s work.

Regulatory committees

Five regulatory committees were established under CCHPBC’s bylaws to support the core programs under our mandate. Committees are made up of a number of members of the public and registrants from each profession. Each Committee has a matrix of the collective skills, knowledge, and diversity that are ideal for the Committee members to bring to the work of the panels.

Registration Committee

  • Supports entry to the profession by: approving policies about granting registration and reinstatement; making decisions on non-routine registration, renewal and reinstatement applications; and, putting limits and conditions on registrant practice. 
  • Approves and oversees exams.
  • Recommends to the Board any requirements for registration and certification, such as:
    • recognized educational institutions
    • entry-level examination
    • completion of a jurisprudence exam.

Registration Committee Terms of Reference

Quality Assurance Committee

  • Defines the desired outcome for and principles of a quality assurance program that promotes the safe, ethical and competent practice of all registrants.
  • Provides advice to staff developing and administering quality assurance programs.
  • Assesses the professional performance of registrants; appoints assessors; and, conducts quality assurance audits to confirm compliance.
  • Refers matters to the Inquiry Committee when it considers doing so is necessary to protect the public.

Quality Assurance Terms of Reference

Inquiry Committee

  • Review complaints or other information that could result in an investigation.
  • Oversees the investigation process and appoints inspectors.
  • When determined to be necessary to protect the public during an investigation, the Committee makes orders for interim action, including imposing limits or conditions, or a suspension of registration.
  • For complaints referred to the Committee, determine the outcome from the statutory options, including:
    • dismissal with no further action;
    • requesting remedial or disciplinary action by agreement; or.
    • directing that a citation be issued for a hearing before the Discipline Committee.

Inquiry Committee Terms of Reference

Discipline Committee

  • Conducts discipline hearings of citations referred by the Inquiry Committee.
  • Conducts permit revocation hearings with respect to health professions corporations (HPCs).
  • Considers findings or admissions of unprofessional conduct by registrants while practising in other jurisdictions. 
  • When determined to be necessary to protect the public during a hearing, the Committee makes orders for interim actions, including imposing limits, conditions, or a suspension of registration.
  • Makes findings and determinations regarding the allegations in a citation. If allegations are proven, impose an appropriate penalty.
  • Provides written decisions.

Discipline Committee Terms of Reference

Professional Practice & Standards Advisory Committee

  • Advisory only. No statutory authority.
  • Provide advice and feedback to staff regarding developing practice and ethical standards and guidance.
  • Provide advice, feedback and recommendations to the Board regarding which practice and ethical standards and guidance require Board approval.
  • Provide advice to the Board on any professional practice matter the Board requests.
  • Provide advice to staff regarding any professional practice matter the staff requests.
  • An avenue for the Board and/or staff to seek advice from Indigenous registrants and members of the public on professional standards and practice issues related to Indigenous-specific racism in the healthcare system.

Professional Practice Standards Advisory Committee

Board support committees

Three Committees support the governance and oversight work of the College’s Board. These Committees are made up of Board members and experts in the various fields represented by the Committees.

Governance Committee

  • Recommend Committee appointments
  • Identify Board gaps
  • Recommend governance policies
  • Oversee governance evaluations
  • Oversee learning of Board and Committee members
  • Ensure governance of the college enables commitment to anti-racism and Indigenous cultural safety.

Governance Committee Terms of Reference

Finance & Audit Committee

  • Advise the Board on financial administration matters
  • Recommend financial policies
  • Oversee enterprise risk management process
  • Oversee budget and make recommendations to the Board regarding fees
  • Facilitate audit process
  • Oversee the college’s investment portfolio
  • Ensure the college’s finances enable commitment to anti-racism and Indigenous cultural safety.

Finance & Audit Committee Terms of Reference

Human Resources Committee

  • Oversees the Registrar and CEO performance and compensation reviews
  • Oversees emergency and long-term Registrar and CEO succession planning
  • Assists the Board in fulfilling its governance oversight responsibilities with respect to the College’s human resources
  • Ensures the College’s strategic human resources policies align with diversity, equity, and inclusion principles and enable the College’s commitment to anti-racism and Indigenous cultural safety.

Human Resources Committee Terms of Reference

Staff

Carin Plischke

Registrar & CEO

Carin is a trained occupational therapist. She was the Registrar and CEO of the College of Occupational Therapists of BC (COTBC). Prior to that, Carin served on the COTBC Board, including as Board Chair. Other roles have included working as the Chief Operating Officer and Executive Lead, Special Projects, at the Office of the Seniors Advocate, and as a Leading Practice Reviewer with the Health Standards Organization. Carin is a member of the Canadian College of Health Leaders.

  • Kate Parisotto, Chief Regulatory Officer
  • Jonathan Ho, Executive Director, Operations
  • Carina Herman, Executive Director, Strategy & Policy
  • Simon Auyoung, Director, Registration
  • Dr. Doug Wright, Director, Quality Assurance & Practice
  • Lee Dorner, Director, Inquiry & Discipline

Careers With CCHPBC

 

The employees of the College of Complementary Health Professionals of BC (CCHPBC) work in a team-based environment where the contributions of each individual are valued. We take pride in offering our employees salaries and a comprehensive benefits package that are competitive within our industry. We also encourage and provide the support needed for each person to develop their professional skills. We focus on creating and maintaining a workforce that honours inclusivity and diversity.

Take a look at our current job postings and apply today if you find anything that matches your qualifications.

 

Current Postings

 

Executive Director, Communications

Manager, HR

Manager, Finance

Policy Advisor